diptych

Grand Tetons and Jackson Lake

Yesterday Wilson and I traveled up to Grand Teton National Park for some interesting photography. Along the way we encountered mysterious rising steam off the Snake River in Idaho’s Swan Valley, before heading up over the Teton Pass. Once we dropped into the Jackson Hole area, the clouds completely filled the valley. At first we thought it might be a wasted trip, but we pressed on and went further north to Jackson Lake. Once at the lake, the cloud cover began breaking and resulted with an impressive layer suspended between the lake surface and the mountain peaks. Afterwards, we returned to the town of Jackson and had lunch at Cafe Genvieve, an eclectic little eatery just of the square. It’s been a busy week of photographing the region with my Missouri colleague!

 

Testing New Lens: Rokinon 14mm f/2.8

Last week my new lens arrived from B&H Photo: a Rokinon 14mm f/2.8  super wide-angle. My primary use for this lens will be for astro-landscape photography, star-trails, and traditional landscapes here in the Pacific Northwest region of the United States. I’ve been eying this lens for a number of years since my astrophotography mentor, Wilson, started using this sweet lens.

But, our weather here in the Northwest hasn’t been too cooperative, with below zero chill factors and overcast skies filled with snow, so I haven’t ventured into the mountains our out onto the Snake River Plain. Instead, I

stayed indoors and the other day ventured into my colleague’s visual communication experimental letterpress lab. I’ve always been fascinated with metal and wood type and she has some really neat large displays of type in her lab. Here’s a diptych shot under available light with my Nikon D800 with the Rokinon 14mm super wide-angle lens. Enjoy!

Letterpress type in ISU's Visual Communication Experimental Labe. © 2013 Terry Ownby.

Letterpress type in ISU‘s Visual Communication Experimental Lab. © 2013 Terry Ownby.

Analog and Digital Technologies

Just a short update to my last posting on the Technology Series. After input and dialogue from my friend, Wilson Hurst (who’s finishing his MFA at the Vermont College of Fine Arts), I revised the overall look and feel of the analog portrait. I’m much happier with this stylistic approach, especially when juxtaposed against the stark white sterility of the digital technology counterpart. Visually, the diptych characterizes Neal Postman‘s notion of Technopoly and America’s surrender of culture to technology. Thus, presented below is the first diptych of the series.

© 2011 Terry Ownby