New Year’s Eve Day-trip

This past New Year’s Eve, I had the pleasure of doing a photo day-trip with Dr. Charles (Chuck) Peterson, our resident herpetologist here at Idaho State University. The day was clear and cold as we started along the east face of the Portneuf Range. When we stopped to photograph the steam coming off the Portneuf River, the temps where hovering around 4F or about -16C. We worked our way over to Soda Springs to see the geyser, but just missed it. Lots of ice though! Eventually, we ended up in western Wyoming and stopped in Afton for lunch at Heggs Grill & Steakhouse. I was really looking forward to a fat, juicy burger, but to our surprise, our waitress told us during the winter they only served “breakfast” all day! Odd. Chuck had pancakes bigger than his head and I continued my quest to find the best biscuits and gravy!  Reminds me when I lived in Wisconsin and the first time I tried to order iced tea during the winter I was told it was “out of season”.  Strange customs. Anyway, we continued our photo excursion by continuing south, crossing over Salt River Pass and then swinging back west into Idaho. An excellent day out shooting with a fellow photographer!


International Dark Sky Park

In November, I went out to Craters of the Moon National Monument with several of my photo students. The monument has been designated an International Dark Sky Park and the night we were there was on a new moon. That was one of the “darkest” experiences I have ever had, with the exception being in the middle of the Pacific Ocean when I was in the Navy.

Super Moon in Idaho

Last night I had the opportunity to take some of my photo students out to a sagebrush field at the top of campus to photograph the moonrise. It was a Super Moon and very stunning! It was neat to see it come up in the notch of Camelback Mountain, which is to the east of campus. The moving clouds made for additional interesting effects in the sky.

Yellowstone Conference

So I’m currently attending the Yellowstone Studies Center Consortium annual conference in West Yellowstone, Montana. Perfect time of year with fall colors, snow, and mild temps! Here’s a few shots from the trip.

Lewiston and Montana Trip

Last week I had the privilege of speaking at the LCSC Center for Arts & History in Lewiston, Idaho. I was an invited lecturer to kick off their three-month exhibition on photographic history of their region. The exhibition is titled: Stories We See—Early Photography of the Valley.  My research has examined Idaho’s first lady photographer, Mrs. Amelia Strang, who had her commercial studio in Lewiston during the mid-1860s. She is a centerpiece in my upcoming book on women photographers of the Pacific Northwest during the 19th century.

The trip took me through the Bitterroot Mountains of Montana, along the Lochsa River, which I did fish on the morning of my return. Next, I ventured down the Bitterroot Valley into Idaho and followed the Salmon River and spent the night at the Syringa Lodge in Salmon. To finish out the trip, I continued south to Challis and then through the Big Lost River Valley to MacKay and then home. Lots of great autumn colors, dramatic clouds, and snow along the mountain peaks.

Went Up the Mountain

Yesterday, I ventured up the tallest mountain immediately next to Pocatello: Kinport Peak. At just over 7,200 feet elevation, Kinport sits southwest from the city and provides an incredible view of town and also of the Snake River Plain. All of the American Falls Reservoir can clearly be viewed from that height. The purpose of risking a rough 4×4  trail with my truck (and yes, there were some “Depends” moments!) was to scout some new locations for doing some future astro-landscape photography. If I were to do some shooting up there, I might need to spend the night because that “road” back down would certainly be a nightmare in the dark! Regardless, I had a peaceful afternoon up there with no one else around. Had lunch on the tailgate of my truck while enjoying a wilderness view to the south. Colors were intense, with the Rocky Mountain Maples in deep orange-red and aspens in bright gold. The fragrance of autumn was abundant along the flat top ridge as I traveled over to Wild Mountain (some maps identify it as Wild Horse Mountain), which is where I live on its lower slopes.

Multi-Media Promo Film of Archaeology Field School

My last post showed some still photograph outtakes from my time camping with the Idaho State University archeology students at their field school over in west-central Idaho. Here’s a short movie “trailer” I made, mostly for fun, using a combination of still photographs, panoramic composites, digital video and audio, i.e., multi-media. If you wonder about the film production company in the opening credits, Ancient Light Studio Productions, LLC, that’s my limit-liability company I registered about 15 years ago….it’s legit. Enjoy!

Archaeology and Photography

This past week I was able to spend several days at the Idaho State University Anthropology Department’s archeology field school over in west-central Idaho. Archeology site director, Dr. Andy Speer and his students were very accommodating in letting me poke around shooting stills and videos, along with capturing sound bites. Hopefully a nice documentary will come out of all this and will help future summer archeology field schools.

The field school/archeology dig site was in the Sweet Ola Valley on a private 1700 acre ranch located in the Boise National Forest. What an incredible view! The area is rich in history and more documentaries are there if I just had the time to keep digging!

The first night there, I couldn’t work on my astro-landscape work due to thunderstorms that kept rolling up the valley. Night two was crystal clear but I was too exhausted to stay up! The following night started off favorable, but then clouds kept scudding right though my field of view, but I at least captured one interesting image.

Here’s a few still photos from the documentary project. Enjoy!