Idaho

Time-Lapse on Kinport Peak

Not quite a month since my knee surgery, I decided to head up the mountain to work on some time-lapse of the great summer clouds. Bear in mind, this is mid-June and lovely spring mountain flowers on the way up and they kept getting better the higher I drove (4-wheel). I was almost to the summit when I passed the 7,000 foot mark when I came around a bend on the north side of the mountain….snow! My last 100 yards were impassable! Needless to say, with my knee still hurting I wasn’t about to hike the rest of the way with all my gear.

Turning my truck around on an un-maintained single-track rocky fire road was certainly a challenge! Very much a white-knuckle affair and very slow going. At one point when the truck was perpendicular to the road with its ass-end just over the edge and the front end up against the mountain, I started having some doubts!!! Anyway, made it back down without too much damage, just ripped off the front license plate and holder from the bumper.

Once I was part-way down, I found a nice little pull out and parked to begin the time-lapse series and had lunch. This was my first official attempt at time-lapse outside my home. So, it was interesting. Also recorded some natural sound of the wind and birds. While the Nikon was doing its thing with the time-lapse, I took my Fuji x20 and placed it in macro mode. This allowed me to get the camera almost on the ground to shoot the wild flowers below.

Even though I didn’t reach the summit, it still turned out to be a productive afternoon a bit lower on the mountain at 6,400′ elevation.

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Marsh Valley Morning

This morning I took a drive down through the northern portion of the Marsh Creek Valley. I started at Inkom and head south along the creek, then cut over to Arimo and up to McCammon for breakfast. There was a fair amount of smoky haze from regional wildfires that actually gave the images a very warm saturation.

Wildfires, Stars, & Ibis

Last night one of my students, Jacob, and I went up to Market Lake Wildlife Refuge near Roberts, Idaho. We hadn’t heard about the wildfire near North Butte over near Menan, but it was putting up a considerable amount of smoke. Thunderstorms were brewing to our northwest up in Montana and the lighting became quite the show later in the evening. The clouds cooperated and moved out of the way once it got dark enough to start shooting (it didn’t get dark until after 11pm!). The Milky Way was pretty spectacular as well. Being a wildlife refuge, we had hundreds of birds buzzing us all evening, including what looked like Glossy Ibises. The bugs were pretty annoying as well!!

Last Night Outing of the Year with ISU Photo Students

Saturday night I went out with five current ISU students and one alum for some astro-landscape photography. For this trip, we went south of Pocatello down to Hawkins Reservoir. Absolutely clear skies, good temps, and low winds (after the sun went down), coupled with some great meteorites made for the start of a pleasant evening. Of course, I brought my camp stove and we had home-made chili and on of the students brought some great cornbread. Great feast!

However, stuff happens, and around 11pm three rather drunk young men nearly drove their pick-up truck into the lake right next to us! After getting the truck out of the water (boat landing), they proceeded to bring all their fishing gear, loud voices, and high explosive fireworks out on the end of the dock that was about 50′ from us. Suddenly, one of the fellows lit the fireworks, which shot about 100′ straight above us and exploded with a boom that shook the entire valley. Needless to say, the campers across the way were not happy! After a long exchange of loud, vociferous profanities, we packed up and left for home. In the composite star-trail shot below, you can see their truck headlights coming towards us on the highway, followed by the firework explosion in the upper right corner of the shot.

 

New Year’s Eve Day-trip

This past New Year’s Eve, I had the pleasure of doing a photo day-trip with Dr. Charles (Chuck) Peterson, our resident herpetologist here at Idaho State University. The day was clear and cold as we started along the east face of the Portneuf Range. When we stopped to photograph the steam coming off the Portneuf River, the temps where hovering around 4F or about -16C. We worked our way over to Soda Springs to see the geyser, but just missed it. Lots of ice though! Eventually, we ended up in western Wyoming and stopped in Afton for lunch at Heggs Grill & Steakhouse. I was really looking forward to a fat, juicy burger, but to our surprise, our waitress told us during the winter they only served “breakfast” all day! Odd. Chuck had pancakes bigger than his head and I continued my quest to find the best biscuits and gravy!  Reminds me when I lived in Wisconsin and the first time I tried to order iced tea during the winter I was told it was “out of season”.  Strange customs. Anyway, we continued our photo excursion by continuing south, crossing over Salt River Pass and then swinging back west into Idaho. An excellent day out shooting with a fellow photographer!

International Dark Sky Park

In November, I went out to Craters of the Moon National Monument with several of my photo students. The monument has been designated an International Dark Sky Park and the night we were there was on a new moon. That was one of the “darkest” experiences I have ever had, with the exception being in the middle of the Pacific Ocean when I was in the Navy.

Super Moon in Idaho

Last night I had the opportunity to take some of my photo students out to a sagebrush field at the top of campus to photograph the moonrise. It was a Super Moon and very stunning! It was neat to see it come up in the notch of Camelback Mountain, which is to the east of campus. The moving clouds made for additional interesting effects in the sky.

Yellowstone Conference

So I’m currently attending the Yellowstone Studies Center Consortium annual conference in West Yellowstone, Montana. Perfect time of year with fall colors, snow, and mild temps! Here’s a few shots from the trip.

Lewiston and Montana Trip

Last week I had the privilege of speaking at the LCSC Center for Arts & History in Lewiston, Idaho. I was an invited lecturer to kick off their three-month exhibition on photographic history of their region. The exhibition is titled: Stories We See—Early Photography of the Valley.  My research has examined Idaho’s first lady photographer, Mrs. Amelia Strang, who had her commercial studio in Lewiston during the mid-1860s. She is a centerpiece in my upcoming book on women photographers of the Pacific Northwest during the 19th century.

The trip took me through the Bitterroot Mountains of Montana, along the Lochsa River, which I did fish on the morning of my return. Next, I ventured down the Bitterroot Valley into Idaho and followed the Salmon River and spent the night at the Syringa Lodge in Salmon. To finish out the trip, I continued south to Challis and then through the Big Lost River Valley to MacKay and then home. Lots of great autumn colors, dramatic clouds, and snow along the mountain peaks.