Road Trip

New Year’s Eve Day-trip

This past New Year’s Eve, I had the pleasure of doing a photo day-trip with Dr. Charles (Chuck) Peterson, our resident herpetologist here at Idaho State University. The day was clear and cold as we started along the east face of the Portneuf Range. When we stopped to photograph the steam coming off the Portneuf River, the temps where hovering around 4F or about -16C. We worked our way over to Soda Springs to see the geyser, but just missed it. Lots of ice though! Eventually, we ended up in western Wyoming and stopped in Afton for lunch at Heggs Grill & Steakhouse. I was really looking forward to a fat, juicy burger, but to our surprise, our waitress told us during the winter they only served “breakfast” all day! Odd. Chuck had pancakes bigger than his head and I continued my quest to find the best biscuits and gravy!  Reminds me when I lived in Wisconsin and the first time I tried to order iced tea during the winter I was told it was “out of season”.  Strange customs. Anyway, we continued our photo excursion by continuing south, crossing over Salt River Pass and then swinging back west into Idaho. An excellent day out shooting with a fellow photographer!

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Atomic Road Trip

The first week of October I drove to southern New Mexico to research and photograph tourists’ activities related to the birth of the atomic era. Specifically, twice a year in April and October, White Sands Missile Range (WSMR) opens the Trinity Site to the public for a one-day visit. Trinity Site is ground zero for the Manhattan Project’s first atomic bomb test on July 16, 1945. Less than a month later atomic bombs were dropped on Hiroshima and Nagasaki, Japan. Trinity Site is located near the Jornada del Muerto desert (Journey of the Dead Man) and in the Tularosa Basin, just northwest of Alamogordo.

Having lived part of my childhood in the mountains east of Alamogordo, I felt it important to visit WSRM to try to better understand where my father worked during the late 1950s. After visiting the WSRM Museum and Missile Park, I did gain some insights into his life and work. For example, I did not realize WSRM was originally established near the end of WWII, in part, for reverse engineering the Nazi V-2 rocket with Germany’s top rocket scientist, Dr. Wehner von Braun. My father’s work overlapped with von Bruan’s for the next decade as my father worked on the Mercury and Gemini manned space programs.

Needless to say, it was an interesting and tiring 5-day road trip, which included three out of four nights camping (two nights were in Mesa Verda National Park).

Yellowstone Conference

So I’m currently attending the Yellowstone Studies Center Consortium annual conference in West Yellowstone, Montana. Perfect time of year with fall colors, snow, and mild temps! Here’s a few shots from the trip.

Lewiston and Montana Trip

Last week I had the privilege of speaking at the LCSC Center for Arts & History in Lewiston, Idaho. I was an invited lecturer to kick off their three-month exhibition on photographic history of their region. The exhibition is titled: Stories We See—Early Photography of the Valley.  My research has examined Idaho’s first lady photographer, Mrs. Amelia Strang, who had her commercial studio in Lewiston during the mid-1860s. She is a centerpiece in my upcoming book on women photographers of the Pacific Northwest during the 19th century.

The trip took me through the Bitterroot Mountains of Montana, along the Lochsa River, which I did fish on the morning of my return. Next, I ventured down the Bitterroot Valley into Idaho and followed the Salmon River and spent the night at the Syringa Lodge in Salmon. To finish out the trip, I continued south to Challis and then through the Big Lost River Valley to MacKay and then home. Lots of great autumn colors, dramatic clouds, and snow along the mountain peaks.

Photo Roadtripping in YNP & GTP

Last week I had the opportunity to take some ISU (Idaho State University) photo and video students to Yellowstone and Grand Teton National Parks for a photography roadtrip. And, by design, two of my close friends (Robert Breshears and Tom Mitchell) from the photography department at the University of Central Missouri, were there at the same time with several of their students. It was a great rendezvous of kindred photographic spirits!  Our combined students had an opportunity to exchange ideas, photograph together, and for some, enjoy bison and elk burgers in Gardiner, Montana at “The Corral“. For our group, we stayed at the Yellowstone Studies Center, which is part of the West Yellowstone Economic Council and is located in West Yellowstone, Montana. This is a great resource for universities when they bring students to Yellowstone National Park for their research and creative activities. Here’s some shots from our week at YNP and GTP!

Fish & Photos on the Owyhee River

This past weekend I managed to combine two of my favorite activities: fly fishing and photography. However, I must admit, even though there’s photos in this post, I did spend most of my time with a fly rod in my hand! For this trip I was with my university’s fly fishing club (FFISU). Only six of us went on the trip, but it turned out to be a perfect size group. We ventured into the southeast Oregon high-desert and set-up camp in the canyon below the Owyhee River dam. Sunshine and 85 degree (F) temps all three days. I think everyone in the group caught at least one brown trout!

Camas National Wildlife Refuge Area

After seeing many of Darren Clark‘s images from the northern reaches of southeast Idaho, I felt the need to visit the area and do some of my own shooting. I made it to the Camas National Wildlife Refuge just as the sun was rising over the Grand Tetons. What a view! Afterwards, I wondered north to Dubois, had some coffee at the gas station, then headed northeast into the U.S. Sheep Experiment Station. After several miles of high desert, I neared the mountains near Kilgore and was hoping to loop over to Spencer but discovered there was no winter maintenance on the back roads. Long trip back! Eventually worked my way north into southern Montana where I had lunch. On the trip back, I cut through the lava fields heading over towards Rexburg, where the Heny’s Fork of the Snake River was very tempting….good thing I left the fly fishing gear at home!

 

Grand Tetons and Jackson Lake

Yesterday Wilson and I traveled up to Grand Teton National Park for some interesting photography. Along the way we encountered mysterious rising steam off the Snake River in Idaho’s Swan Valley, before heading up over the Teton Pass. Once we dropped into the Jackson Hole area, the clouds completely filled the valley. At first we thought it might be a wasted trip, but we pressed on and went further north to Jackson Lake. Once at the lake, the cloud cover began breaking and resulted with an impressive layer suspended between the lake surface and the mountain peaks. Afterwards, we returned to the town of Jackson and had lunch at Cafe Genvieve, an eclectic little eatery just of the square. It’s been a busy week of photographing the region with my Missouri colleague!

 

Teton Area-Jackson Hole

Finally, I had some time to get away from the photo history book I’m writing and got out to make some environmental landscape shots. Jackson, Wyoming is only about 2.5 hours away, so I drove up before sunrise to explore possible shooting areas for when my friend and prior university colleague, Wilson Hurst, arrives next week. The forecast was for partly cloudy skies, but unfortunately, it was crystal clear….which also meant it was cold! Right after the sun broke between the Teton peaks, the temps dropped to about -3F (-19C). One visually exciting result was the concentrated hoarfrost on all the trees and steaming rivers.