digital media

Multi-Media Promo Film of Archaeology Field School

My last post showed some still photograph outtakes from my time camping with the Idaho State University archeology students at their field school over in west-central Idaho. Here’s a short movie “trailer” I made, mostly for fun, using a combination of still photographs, panoramic composites, digital video and audio, i.e., multi-media. If you wonder about the film production company in the opening credits, Ancient Light Studio Productions, LLC, that’s my limit-liability company I registered about 15 years ago….it’s legit. Enjoy!

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NOLA’s French Quarter

Earlier this month I attended the Society for Photographic Education (SPE) annual conference in New Orleans…my favorite Southern city! Unfortunately, the weather was a bit uncooperative and rained nearly my entire stay. On Saturday morning I had a two-hour gap between conference sessions and the rain stopped, so I went strolling down Canal Street and eventually into the French Quarter on both Royal and Bourbon Streets. Festivities were cranking up early in the morning, as there were Saint Patrick’s Day and Saint Joseph’s Day parades throughout the neighborhood. Below are a few shots made with my travel camera, a Fujifilm x20 digital rangefinder, complete with the 1960s black and silver retro finish. Last year I had several people in NYC stop me wanting to know if was actually a film camera!

Stopping the Time-Space Continuum

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Captured with Nikon D700, continuous frame at 5fps, shutter speed 1/8000s. © 2013 Terry Ownby.

Above is an example from a recent photo shoot where I stopped time in fractional slices. I was using a Nikon D700 set to the Continuous High mode, which fires off 5 frames per second with a normal battery. This illustration uses a total of six images captured during one shooting burst.
On the other hand, the illustration below of star trails uses 22 separate photographs using an external intervalometer by Aputure. These were five minute exposures with 1/10second interval between shots.

Star Trails at Kearn Wildlife Area, near Whiteman AFB. © 2013 Terry Ownby.

Star Trails at Kearn Wildlife Area, near Whiteman AFB. © 2013 Terry Ownby.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Light Orbs at Poague Wildlife Conservation Area

So this past Friday three die-hard photographers ventured out for a freezing night of photographing light orb phenomena at the Poague Wildlife Conservation Area, near Clinton, MO.  Although the temps dropped to 33oF (0.5oC), we had nearly a full moon to conduct our research into live performance art as captured with still-digital imaging technology. Wilson brought along several new light emitting devices, such as LED multi-colored light wands that changed colors and pulsated like strobes. Robert gave a great performance spinning burning steel wool, although during my performance the lanyard broke, sending a fiery trail off into the pond’s shoreline. Fortunately there were no uncontrolled fires!

Of course being this far removed from civilization, we were paid a visit by some local-yokels in their rattrap, exhaust leaking van, while they were spotlighting deer and other game in the woods. I think they were rather surprised to find a bunch of “old” guys in their haunt with tripod-mounted cameras and other paraphernalia. As they whispered to us (I suppose as to not frighten their illegal quarry) about our doings in their neck-of-the-woods, we simply replied that stars where our photographic subject. Once satisfied, they left and we resumed our light painting performance!

Despite the cold evening, the howling coyotes, and the curious kinfolk, we managed to stay warm throughout the performance and some of us enjoyed some ice-cold Guinness stout and Blue Moon winter spiced ale!

© 2012 Terry Ownby

© 2012 Terry Ownby

© 2012 Terry Ownby

Brooklyn Bridge

Last Friday morning we spent time walking across the Brooklyn Bridge. Afterwards, we made our way around the Brooklyn Bridge Park, where I shot this panorama. The Brooklyn Bridge is to the left, while to the right is the Manhattan Bridge. Once we finished photographing along the waterfront, we went over a couple of blocks and had an incredible New York style pizza at Grimaldi’s, which is famous for their pizzas.

The waterfront between the Brooklyn Bridge and the Manhattan Bridge.

Analog and Digital Technologies

Just a short update to my last posting on the Technology Series. After input and dialogue from my friend, Wilson Hurst (who’s finishing his MFA at the Vermont College of Fine Arts), I revised the overall look and feel of the analog portrait. I’m much happier with this stylistic approach, especially when juxtaposed against the stark white sterility of the digital technology counterpart. Visually, the diptych characterizes Neal Postman‘s notion of Technopoly and America’s surrender of culture to technology. Thus, presented below is the first diptych of the series.

© 2011 Terry Ownby

Self-Publishing

The idea of publishing a book of images is something I think most photographers have pondered from time to time. However publishing a monograph in the past was not always an easy task, especially when so many photographers were vying for the editor’s eye. But today, that situation is changing. Now the photographer can become the editor.

What am I talking about? Good question. What I’m getting at is the notion of self-publishing through what’s known as print-on-demand technology. Currently there are a number of excellent online presses offering excellent opportunities for photographers (and writers) to get their work in print. Two that readily come to mind are Lulu and Blurb. Both companies offer an array of printing formats including: softcover, hardcover with dustjacket, and spiral bound. An added benefit with this type of publishing, is many of these companies offer marketing services where you set the selling price and they function as order fulfillment companies, sending you a check for profits on your sales. For and additional fee, many of these companies can provide you with an ISBN so you can market to third parties such as retail booksellers like Borders or Barnes and Noble.

This type of publishing can be useful to photographers in a number of ways. One way is that of providing custom, professional perfect bound portfolios for sending to potential clients. Or, you could simply publish a book and give as holiday or birthday gifts. Many portrait and wedding photographers take advantage of these services in order to present their clients with a beautifully finished product of their event. I also see this as a great opportunity for the fine art photographer wanting to produce a monograph. This is what I’ve done with part of my Incongruity series. I anticipate publishing my second book sometime later this year.

Dustjacket from my monograph Incongruity: found american cultural objects.

© 2007 Terry Ownby