Idaho

Time-Lapse on Kinport Peak

Not quite a month since my knee surgery, I decided to head up the mountain to work on some time-lapse of the great summer clouds. Bear in mind, this is mid-June and lovely spring mountain flowers on the way up and they kept getting better the higher I drove (4-wheel). I was almost to the summit when I passed the 7,000 foot mark when I came around a bend on the north side of the mountain….snow! My last 100 yards were impassable! Needless to say, with my knee still hurting I wasn’t about to hike the rest of the way with all my gear.

Turning my truck around on an un-maintained single-track rocky fire road was certainly a challenge! Very much a white-knuckle affair and very slow going. At one point when the truck was perpendicular to the road with its ass-end just over the edge and the front end up against the mountain, I started having some doubts!!! Anyway, made it back down without too much damage, just ripped off the front license plate and holder from the bumper.

Once I was part-way down, I found a nice little pull out and parked to begin the time-lapse series and had lunch. This was my first official attempt at time-lapse outside my home. So, it was interesting. Also recorded some natural sound of the wind and birds. While the Nikon was doing its thing with the time-lapse, I took my Fuji x20 and placed it in macro mode. This allowed me to get the camera almost on the ground to shoot the wild flowers below.

Even though I didn’t reach the summit, it still turned out to be a productive afternoon a bit lower on the mountain at 6,400′ elevation.

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Marsh Valley Morning

This morning I took a drive down through the northern portion of the Marsh Creek Valley. I started at Inkom and head south along the creek, then cut over to Arimo and up to McCammon for breakfast. There was a fair amount of smoky haze from regional wildfires that actually gave the images a very warm saturation.

Super Moon in Idaho

Last night I had the opportunity to take some of my photo students out to a sagebrush field at the top of campus to photograph the moonrise. It was a Super Moon and very stunning! It was neat to see it come up in the notch of Camelback Mountain, which is to the east of campus. The moving clouds made for additional interesting effects in the sky.

Lewiston and Montana Trip

Last week I had the privilege of speaking at the LCSC Center for Arts & History in Lewiston, Idaho. I was an invited lecturer to kick off their three-month exhibition on photographic history of their region. The exhibition is titled: Stories We See—Early Photography of the Valley.  My research has examined Idaho’s first lady photographer, Mrs. Amelia Strang, who had her commercial studio in Lewiston during the mid-1860s. She is a centerpiece in my upcoming book on women photographers of the Pacific Northwest during the 19th century.

The trip took me through the Bitterroot Mountains of Montana, along the Lochsa River, which I did fish on the morning of my return. Next, I ventured down the Bitterroot Valley into Idaho and followed the Salmon River and spent the night at the Syringa Lodge in Salmon. To finish out the trip, I continued south to Challis and then through the Big Lost River Valley to MacKay and then home. Lots of great autumn colors, dramatic clouds, and snow along the mountain peaks.

Went Up the Mountain

Yesterday, I ventured up the tallest mountain immediately next to Pocatello: Kinport Peak. At just over 7,200 feet elevation, Kinport sits southwest from the city and provides an incredible view of town and also of the Snake River Plain. All of the American Falls Reservoir can clearly be viewed from that height. The purpose of risking a rough 4×4  trail with my truck (and yes, there were some “Depends” moments!) was to scout some new locations for doing some future astro-landscape photography. If I were to do some shooting up there, I might need to spend the night because that “road” back down would certainly be a nightmare in the dark! Regardless, I had a peaceful afternoon up there with no one else around. Had lunch on the tailgate of my truck while enjoying a wilderness view to the south. Colors were intense, with the Rocky Mountain Maples in deep orange-red and aspens in bright gold. The fragrance of autumn was abundant along the flat top ridge as I traveled over to Wild Mountain (some maps identify it as Wild Horse Mountain), which is where I live on its lower slopes.

Photo Roadtripping in YNP & GTP

Last week I had the opportunity to take some ISU (Idaho State University) photo and video students to Yellowstone and Grand Teton National Parks for a photography roadtrip. And, by design, two of my close friends (Robert Breshears and Tom Mitchell) from the photography department at the University of Central Missouri, were there at the same time with several of their students. It was a great rendezvous of kindred photographic spirits!  Our combined students had an opportunity to exchange ideas, photograph together, and for some, enjoy bison and elk burgers in Gardiner, Montana at “The Corral“. For our group, we stayed at the Yellowstone Studies Center, which is part of the West Yellowstone Economic Council and is located in West Yellowstone, Montana. This is a great resource for universities when they bring students to Yellowstone National Park for their research and creative activities. Here’s some shots from our week at YNP and GTP!

Multi-Media Promo Film of Archaeology Field School

My last post showed some still photograph outtakes from my time camping with the Idaho State University archeology students at their field school over in west-central Idaho. Here’s a short movie “trailer” I made, mostly for fun, using a combination of still photographs, panoramic composites, digital video and audio, i.e., multi-media. If you wonder about the film production company in the opening credits, Ancient Light Studio Productions, LLC, that’s my limit-liability company I registered about 15 years ago….it’s legit. Enjoy!

Archaeology and Photography

This past week I was able to spend several days at the Idaho State University Anthropology Department’s archeology field school over in west-central Idaho. Archeology site director, Dr. Andy Speer and his students were very accommodating in letting me poke around shooting stills and videos, along with capturing sound bites. Hopefully a nice documentary will come out of all this and will help future summer archeology field schools.

The field school/archeology dig site was in the Sweet Ola Valley on a private 1700 acre ranch located in the Boise National Forest. What an incredible view! The area is rich in history and more documentaries are there if I just had the time to keep digging!

The first night there, I couldn’t work on my astro-landscape work due to thunderstorms that kept rolling up the valley. Night two was crystal clear but I was too exhausted to stay up! The following night started off favorable, but then clouds kept scudding right though my field of view, but I at least captured one interesting image.

Here’s a few still photos from the documentary project. Enjoy!

Camas National Wildlife Refuge Area

After seeing many of Darren Clark‘s images from the northern reaches of southeast Idaho, I felt the need to visit the area and do some of my own shooting. I made it to the Camas National Wildlife Refuge just as the sun was rising over the Grand Tetons. What a view! Afterwards, I wondered north to Dubois, had some coffee at the gas station, then headed northeast into the U.S. Sheep Experiment Station. After several miles of high desert, I neared the mountains near Kilgore and was hoping to loop over to Spencer but discovered there was no winter maintenance on the back roads. Long trip back! Eventually worked my way north into southern Montana where I had lunch. On the trip back, I cut through the lava fields heading over towards Rexburg, where the Heny’s Fork of the Snake River was very tempting….good thing I left the fly fishing gear at home!