ISU Photo Media

Winter Wonder Land: Yellowstone

Going to Yellowstone National Park during the winter is one of those “bucket list” items everyone should experience. I had my opportunity earlier this month when Dr. Charles “Chuck” Peterson, a biologist at Idaho State University, coordinated a private snow coach trip. We had a 1950s era Bombardier tracked machine that looked like it should be on the battlefield! Fun! In total, there were eight of us, plus the guide; four biologists and four photography professors. Days were cold, near 0oF (-18oC) and nights were even colder!

Three life-long friends from the Kansas City area and former faculty colleagues at the University of Central Missouri, flew up for the adventure. Unknown to Wilson Hurst that Tom Mitchell and Robert Breshears were going to be there, it came as quite the surprise when he finally met them during our rendezvous!

Here’s a number of my favorite shots from the trip. I used a variety of gear, including Nikon D800, Fujifilm X20, and my iPhone 7 through a spotting scope. Enjoy!

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Marsh Valley Morning

This morning I took a drive down through the northern portion of the Marsh Creek Valley. I started at Inkom and head south along the creek, then cut over to Arimo and up to McCammon for breakfast. There was a fair amount of smoky haze from regional wildfires that actually gave the images a very warm saturation.

Wildfires, Stars, & Ibis

Last night one of my students, Jacob, and I went up to Market Lake Wildlife Refuge near Roberts, Idaho. We hadn’t heard about the wildfire near North Butte over near Menan, but it was putting up a considerable amount of smoke. Thunderstorms were brewing to our northwest up in Montana and the lighting became quite the show later in the evening. The clouds cooperated and moved out of the way once it got dark enough to start shooting (it didn’t get dark until after 11pm!). The Milky Way was pretty spectacular as well. Being a wildlife refuge, we had hundreds of birds buzzing us all evening, including what looked like Glossy Ibises. The bugs were pretty annoying as well!!

Super Moon in Idaho

Last night I had the opportunity to take some of my photo students out to a sagebrush field at the top of campus to photograph the moonrise. It was a Super Moon and very stunning! It was neat to see it come up in the notch of Camelback Mountain, which is to the east of campus. The moving clouds made for additional interesting effects in the sky.

Yellowstone Conference

So I’m currently attending the Yellowstone Studies Center Consortium annual conference in West Yellowstone, Montana. Perfect time of year with fall colors, snow, and mild temps! Here’s a few shots from the trip.

Went Up the Mountain

Yesterday, I ventured up the tallest mountain immediately next to Pocatello: Kinport Peak. At just over 7,200 feet elevation, Kinport sits southwest from the city and provides an incredible view of town and also of the Snake River Plain. All of the American Falls Reservoir can clearly be viewed from that height. The purpose of risking a rough 4×4  trail with my truck (and yes, there were some “Depends” moments!) was to scout some new locations for doing some future astro-landscape photography. If I were to do some shooting up there, I might need to spend the night because that “road” back down would certainly be a nightmare in the dark! Regardless, I had a peaceful afternoon up there with no one else around. Had lunch on the tailgate of my truck while enjoying a wilderness view to the south. Colors were intense, with the Rocky Mountain Maples in deep orange-red and aspens in bright gold. The fragrance of autumn was abundant along the flat top ridge as I traveled over to Wild Mountain (some maps identify it as Wild Horse Mountain), which is where I live on its lower slopes.

Photo Roadtripping in YNP & GTP

Last week I had the opportunity to take some ISU (Idaho State University) photo and video students to Yellowstone and Grand Teton National Parks for a photography roadtrip. And, by design, two of my close friends (Robert Breshears and Tom Mitchell) from the photography department at the University of Central Missouri, were there at the same time with several of their students. It was a great rendezvous of kindred photographic spirits!  Our combined students had an opportunity to exchange ideas, photograph together, and for some, enjoy bison and elk burgers in Gardiner, Montana at “The Corral“. For our group, we stayed at the Yellowstone Studies Center, which is part of the West Yellowstone Economic Council and is located in West Yellowstone, Montana. This is a great resource for universities when they bring students to Yellowstone National Park for their research and creative activities. Here’s some shots from our week at YNP and GTP!

Archaeology and Photography

This past week I was able to spend several days at the Idaho State University Anthropology Department’s archeology field school over in west-central Idaho. Archeology site director, Dr. Andy Speer and his students were very accommodating in letting me poke around shooting stills and videos, along with capturing sound bites. Hopefully a nice documentary will come out of all this and will help future summer archeology field schools.

The field school/archeology dig site was in the Sweet Ola Valley on a private 1700 acre ranch located in the Boise National Forest. What an incredible view! The area is rich in history and more documentaries are there if I just had the time to keep digging!

The first night there, I couldn’t work on my astro-landscape work due to thunderstorms that kept rolling up the valley. Night two was crystal clear but I was too exhausted to stay up! The following night started off favorable, but then clouds kept scudding right though my field of view, but I at least captured one interesting image.

Here’s a few still photos from the documentary project. Enjoy!

Grand Tetons and Jackson Lake

Yesterday Wilson and I traveled up to Grand Teton National Park for some interesting photography. Along the way we encountered mysterious rising steam off the Snake River in Idaho’s Swan Valley, before heading up over the Teton Pass. Once we dropped into the Jackson Hole area, the clouds completely filled the valley. At first we thought it might be a wasted trip, but we pressed on and went further north to Jackson Lake. Once at the lake, the cloud cover began breaking and resulted with an impressive layer suspended between the lake surface and the mountain peaks. Afterwards, we returned to the town of Jackson and had lunch at Cafe Genvieve, an eclectic little eatery just of the square. It’s been a busy week of photographing the region with my Missouri colleague!