nature

Time-Lapse on Kinport Peak

Not quite a month since my knee surgery, I decided to head up the mountain to work on some time-lapse of the great summer clouds. Bear in mind, this is mid-June and lovely spring mountain flowers on the way up and they kept getting better the higher I drove (4-wheel). I was almost to the summit when I passed the 7,000 foot mark when I came around a bend on the north side of the mountain….snow! My last 100 yards were impassable! Needless to say, with my knee still hurting I wasn’t about to hike the rest of the way with all my gear.

Turning my truck around on an un-maintained single-track rocky fire road was certainly a challenge! Very much a white-knuckle affair and very slow going. At one point when the truck was perpendicular to the road with its ass-end just over the edge and the front end up against the mountain, I started having some doubts!!! Anyway, made it back down without too much damage, just ripped off the front license plate and holder from the bumper.

Once I was part-way down, I found a nice little pull out and parked to begin the time-lapse series and had lunch. This was my first official attempt at time-lapse outside my home. So, it was interesting. Also recorded some natural sound of the wind and birds. While the Nikon was doing its thing with the time-lapse, I took my Fuji x20 and placed it in macro mode. This allowed me to get the camera almost on the ground to shoot the wild flowers below.

Even though I didn’t reach the summit, it still turned out to be a productive afternoon a bit lower on the mountain at 6,400′ elevation.

Winter Wonder Land: Yellowstone

Going to Yellowstone National Park during the winter is one of those “bucket list” items everyone should experience. I had my opportunity earlier this month when Dr. Charles “Chuck” Peterson, a biologist at Idaho State University, coordinated a private snow coach trip. We had a 1950s era Bombardier tracked machine that looked like it should be on the battlefield! Fun! In total, there were eight of us, plus the guide; four biologists and four photography professors. Days were cold, near 0oF (-18oC) and nights were even colder!

Three life-long friends from the Kansas City area and former faculty colleagues at the University of Central Missouri, flew up for the adventure. Unknown to Wilson Hurst that Tom Mitchell and Robert Breshears were going to be there, it came as quite the surprise when he finally met them during our rendezvous!

Here’s a number of my favorite shots from the trip. I used a variety of gear, including Nikon D800, Fujifilm X20, and my iPhone 7 through a spotting scope. Enjoy!

Autumn in Grand Teton National Park

This week I managed to clear my calendar for an overnight trip up to Grand Teton National Park for some autumn photography. Unfortunately, every other tourist was thinking the same thing! As a result, the only affordable accommodation was actually between GTNP and YNP in a transition area known as John D. Rockefeller Jr. Memorial Parkway. There, I stayed in a one-room cabin at Flagg Ranch. With no heat or electricity, I found it challenging when I woke up at 5:15am to 24o F (about -4o C). Regardless, saw some beautiful light and landscapes while there.

Wildfires, Stars, & Ibis

Last night one of my students, Jacob, and I went up to Market Lake Wildlife Refuge near Roberts, Idaho. We hadn’t heard about the wildfire near North Butte over near Menan, but it was putting up a considerable amount of smoke. Thunderstorms were brewing to our northwest up in Montana and the lighting became quite the show later in the evening. The clouds cooperated and moved out of the way once it got dark enough to start shooting (it didn’t get dark until after 11pm!). The Milky Way was pretty spectacular as well. Being a wildlife refuge, we had hundreds of birds buzzing us all evening, including what looked like Glossy Ibises. The bugs were pretty annoying as well!!

New Year’s Eve Day-trip

This past New Year’s Eve, I had the pleasure of doing a photo day-trip with Dr. Charles (Chuck) Peterson, our resident herpetologist here at Idaho State University. The day was clear and cold as we started along the east face of the Portneuf Range. When we stopped to photograph the steam coming off the Portneuf River, the temps where hovering around 4F or about -16C. We worked our way over to Soda Springs to see the geyser, but just missed it. Lots of ice though! Eventually, we ended up in western Wyoming and stopped in Afton for lunch at Heggs Grill & Steakhouse. I was really looking forward to a fat, juicy burger, but to our surprise, our waitress told us during the winter they only served “breakfast” all day! Odd. Chuck had pancakes bigger than his head and I continued my quest to find the best biscuits and gravy!  Reminds me when I lived in Wisconsin and the first time I tried to order iced tea during the winter I was told it was “out of season”.  Strange customs. Anyway, we continued our photo excursion by continuing south, crossing over Salt River Pass and then swinging back west into Idaho. An excellent day out shooting with a fellow photographer!